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Staff

Carrie Ching

Carrie Ching

Independent Multimedia Producer

Biography

Carrie Ching is an award-winning, independent multimedia journalist and producer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. For six years, she led digital storytelling projects at the Center for Investigative Reporting as senior multimedia producer. Her multimedia reports have been featured by NPR.org, The Huffington Post, Rolling Stone, Grist, Time.com, Fast Company, the Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, KQED, PBS NewsHour, Salon.com, Mother Jones, Public Radio International, Poynter, Columbia Journalism Review and many other publications. Her specialty is crafting digital narratives and exploring ways to use video, audio, photography, animation and interactive graphics to push the boundaries of storytelling on the Web, tablets and mobile. Her work has been honored with awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, Investigative Reporters and Editors, Best of the West, the Online News Association, Scripps Howard, The Gracies, and was part of the entry in a Pulitzer-finalist project. Prior to her time at CIR she was a magazine and book editor, video journalist, newspaper reporter and TV comedy scriptwriter. She was on the 2010 Eddie Adams Workshop faculty as a multimedia producer working with MediaStorm to teach digital storytelling techniques to photojournalists. She completed a master’s degree in journalism at UC Berkeley in 2005.

Articles

The highs and lows of investigative reporting

Imagine you're a pot reporter. Pot as in weed, marijuana, bud. What could possibly go wrong when you cover a drug that is legally contentious but widely tolerated? CIR reporter Michael Montgomery finds out the hard way.

Apr 25, 2013
National Security

Video: The Man Who Killed Osama bin Laden

The following story is based on a series of interviews with the Navy SEAL who killed Osama bin Laden. To protect his identity, we are not using his real voice. Reported by Phil Bronstein of the Center for Investigative Reporting in cooperation with Esquire

Feb 11, 2013
Health Care

With rise in young painkiller abusers, officials see more heroin overdoses

With the steady rise of prescription drug abuse across the state, young pill addicts are succumbing in increasing numbers to another vice: heroin. For young people who otherwise might have been turned off by the needles and track marks associated with intravenous drug use, switching from abusing pills perceived as “clean” and “safe” to snorting

Aug 15, 2012
Environment

The hidden costs of hamburgers

Americans love hamburgers – we each eat an average of three a week. But what are the hidden costs? It turns out that livestock create about as much greenhouse gas pollution as cars, planes and other forms of transport. They also take a heavy environmental toll on land and water worldwide. How can we reduce our impact?

Aug 2, 2012
National Security

Animation: Suspect America

After 9/11, the government began encouraging local police, private security and everyday Americans to report so-called "suspicious activity" that may indicate a security threat. More than 15,000 reports are already compiled in one database that can be searched nationwide by law enforcement authorities. Taking photos of landmarks, walking "nervously" and writing in a notebook are

Sep 7, 2011
Oil and Mining

The Price of Gas

What's the price of gasoline? In the U.S. it's about $4 a gallon. But some experts say the true price of gas is much higher. What about the costs of pollution, and the global and local problems caused by it? Who pays for those? This animated feature from the Center for Investigative Reporting calculates the

Jun 14, 2011
Accountability

Out of Bounds? Cape Town’s Cleanup for the World Cup

As soccer stars and fans converge in South Africa for the World Cup, Christopher Werth travels into the Cape Town slums to investigate reports that people are being displaced to make way for the games. Werth's reporting was supported in part by a grant from CIR's Henry Demarest Lloyd Investigative Fund. + Watch part two

Jun 8, 2010