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Staff

Suzanne Goldenberg

Reporter, The Guardian

Biography

Suzanne Goldenberg is the US environment correspondent of the Guardian and is based in Washington DC. She has won several awards for her work in the Middle East, and in 2003 covered the US invasion of Iraq from Baghdad. She is author of Madam President, about Hillary Clinton's historic run for White House.

Articles

Environment

Climate study predicts a watery future for New York, Boston and Miami

For much of Miami, the date of no return – by which time a future under water would be certain – would be 2041, a recent study found.Mr.Thomas/Flickr.com More than 1,700 American cities and towns – including Boston, New York, and Miami – are at greater risk from rising sea levels than previously feared, a new study has found.

Jul 31, 2013
Environment

Drought that ravaged US crops likely to worsen in 2013, forecast warns

A severe drought hit the Midwest hard in 2012. USDAgov/Flickr.com The historic drought that laid waste to America's grain and corn belt is unlikely to ease before the middle of this year, a government forecast warned Thursday. The annual spring outlook from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted hotter, drier conditions across much of the U.S., including parts of

Mar 22, 2013
Environment

Environmentalists still waiting for Obama to act on climate change

Environmental and climate advocacy groups host the Crude Awakening March on May 11, 2010.Chris Eichler/Flickr.com It's been 114 days since President Barack Obama promised on the night of his re-election to protect future generations from – in his words – "the destructive power of a warming planet." It's been 38 days since he renewed and

Mar 1, 2013
Environment

Climate change set to make America hotter, drier and more disaster-prone

The draft report forecasts an increased risk of extreme events in the Midwest, like last year's drought.CraneStation/Flickr Future generations of Americans can expect to spend 25 days a year sweltering in temperatures above 100 degrees, with climate change on course to turn the country into a hotter, drier, and more disaster-prone place. The National Climate Assessment, released in

Jan 11, 2013