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Accountability

Accountability

Unsung Hero

With his ahead-of-the-curve reporting from Vietnam for Time magazine and influential management stints at the Los Angeles Times, Sacramento Bee and San Francisco Examiner, Frank McCulloch was one of the great journalists of the past 50 years. Unfortunately, far too few people know that. Over the past year, as the conflict in Iraq slid from

National Security

Anti-Terror Database Got Show at White House

Note: This story is based in part on reporting by O?Harrow for his forthcoming book, to be published in January by Free Press and supported by the Center for Investigative Reporting. One day in January 2003, an entrepreneur from Florida named Hank Asher walked into the Roosevelt Room of the White House to demonstrate a

Money and Politics

Courting Big Business

Is the Bush White House using the courts as another way to pay back special interests? When President Bush nominated William G. Myers III for the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco in May 2003, judicial experience apparently wasn't a factor in the choice. Myers has spent little time in the courtroom

Money and Politics

Also Turned Away

Forty-four states in the United States today bar people with mental illnesses from voting. Apart from laws affecting felons, these are the last overt voting restrictions on the books for citizens over 18. The exclusionary laws typically used in most states apply to those found to be "mentally incompetent" by the court and then placed

Nov 6, 2003
Money and Politics

Whose Vote Counts?

Millions of Americans are routinely stymied when attempting the most basic right of our democracy – casting a vote. In the radio documentary "Whose Vote Counts?," CIR associate reporter Rebecca Perl investigates how citizens are legally denied or left out of the voting process. In an important election year, an estimated 10 million votes (or

Nov 3, 2003
Money and Politics

Clark Worked for Ark. Data Firm: Acxiom Role Part of Surveillance Debate

Retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark helped an Arkansas information company win a contract to assist development of an airline passenger screening system, one of the largest surveillance programs ever devised by the government. Starting just after the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, Clark sought out dozens of government and industry officials on behalf of Acxiom

Sep 27, 2003
National Security

U.S. Backs Florida’s New Counterterrorism Database: ‘Matrix’ Offers Law Agencies Faster Access to Americans’ Personal Records

Police in Florida are creating a counterterrorism database designed to give law enforcement agencies around the country a powerful new tool to analyze billions of records about both criminals and ordinary Americans. Organizers said the system, dubbed Matrix, enables investigators to find patterns and links among people and events faster than ever before, combining police

Aug 6, 2003
National Security

Surveillance Proposal Expanded

A passenger-screening system designed to help capture terrorists could also be used to target people suspected of violent crimes, under a proposal approved by Department of Homeland Security officials. Previously, government officials said the surveillance system known as CAPPS II would be used only to target potential terrorists and their allies — limits intended to

Jul 31, 2003
Accountability

Six Weeks in Autumn

Assistant Attorney General Viet Dinh took his seat in La Colline restaurant on Capitol Hill and signaled for a cup of coffee. It was one of those standard Washington breakfasts, where politicos mix schmoozing and big ideas to start their days. An intense foot soldier for Attorney General John Ashcroft, Dinh had been in his

Oct 27, 2002
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