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Bench Warfare

With an eye on congressional elections this November, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist signaled last month that he was itching for a fight, pledging floor votes in the Senate for some of President Bush's most controversial judicial nominees. Republicans would strategically welcome renewed partisan warfare over judges, it appeared, because it could help rally right-wing

Money and Politics

Key Bush Judge Under Ethics Cloud

Key Democrats denounced Terrence Boyle on Capitol Hill Monday and Tuesday, after a Salon report revealed that the controversial judge, nominated to one of the nation's highest courts by President Bush, violated federal law on conflicts of interest. As the debate over Boyle heated up, the White House acknowledged that Boyle should have recused himself

Money and Politics

Documents Show Controversial Bush Judge Broke Ethics Law

Starting in 2002, Terrence W. Boyle, a longtime federal district court judge in North Carolina, presided over a lawsuit against General Electric, in which the corporation stood accused of illegally denying disability benefits to a long-standing employee. Deep into the case, on Jan. 15, 2004, Judge Boyle bought stock in General Electric, according to a

Money and Politics

Bush Withdraws Nominee

President Bush's nomination of Judge James H. Payne to one of the highest courts in the nation has been withdrawn, following questions raised in late January about Payne's ethics. Currently chief judge of the U.S. District Court in Muskogee, Okla., Payne was nominated by Bush to the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals last

Mar 8, 2006
Money and Politics

Bush Judge’s Rating Lowered

In a rare move, the American Bar Association revoked its top rating of a Bush judicial nominee last week, after CIR revealed in a Salon.com story his repeated conflicts of interest while on the bench. The ABA originally gave Judge James H. Payne its highest mark – a unanimous “well qualified” – after he was

Mar 2, 2006
Money and Politics

Bush Judge Under Ethics Cloud

A federal judge nominated by President Bush to one of the nation's highest courts disqualified himself from two cases against a corporation in which he has held personal investments, after a report revealed that his career on the bench has been riddled with conflicts of interest. On Jan. 23, following the Salon story "Bush Nominee

Jan 31, 2006
Money and Politics

Bush Nominee Appears to Violate Conflict of Interest Rules

A judge nominated by President Bush to one of the highest courts in the nation apparently violated federal law repeatedly while serving on the federal bench. Judge James H. Payne, 64, who was nominated by Bush in late September to join the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, based in Denver, issued more than 100

Jan 23, 2006
Money and Politics

Harriet Miers Is All Business

Bush's Supreme Court nominee does have a paper trail — leading to major corporations. The outcry has run the gamut: From an angry religious right to wary liberals and Senate Democrats, President Bush managed to please almost no one with his nomination of Harriet Miers for the nation's top bench. But as pro-lifers and pro-choicers

Oct 7, 2005
Money and Politics

The Moneyed Scales of Justice?

"I have no platform," said Chief Justice-designate John Roberts to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee when hearings convened Monday on Capitol Hill. "I come before the committee with no agenda." But what Roberts does bring before the committee is a long list of ties to corporate America from his years of working as a

Sep 13, 2005
Money and Politics

John G. Roberts, Jr.

On Tuesday, July 19, 2005, President Bush nominated John G. Roberts, Jr., to the Supreme Court. As part of its ongoing investigation into Bush’s federal court nominees, CIR has made Roberts’ 2003 financial disclosure statement and Senate confirmation questionnaire freely and easily accessible to the public on the Courting Influence web site. During Bush’s first

Jul 21, 2005
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